agenda Th/F May 3/4: read & write

learning goal: Stephen, Matsu, Sachi–on which one of these characters do you find yourself focusing most?  Why do you think this person draws you in more than the other two?

introduction to the day (5′)

reading time (45′)

writing time (20′): an email to bill.brown@hies.org (subject: focal character); in body of email write 5-10-sentence response to question in today’s learning goal; send email by the end of class; begin your email by identifying how far you have read–i.e., what page number

 

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agenda T/W May 1/2: start new novel

learning goal: What happens to painting when the viewer sees it in various lights?  What happens to a novel when the same kind of thing happens?

introduction to novel and the bookmark pamphlet

time to read towards this week’s goal–i.e., “Autumn”

due T/W May 1/2: Macbeth paragraph

How much or how little does the following description fit Macbeth: “Overcoming his queasiness, the soldier ends up submitting to the order, and is then haunted by the thought that he’s colluded in a crime” (Eyal Press, Beautiful Souls, 7).

paragraph due to TRNTN before this T/W class begins; be careful to acknowledge all sources of help–e.g., classmates, Sparknotes, etc.

___________

find your copy of the novel, The Samurai’s Garden (see reading schedule distributed in class F/M)

read the first section (“Autumn”) of the novel by the end of the week (Fri May 4)

citing lines, embedding quotes

When embedding passages in your paragraph, follow the examples shown below.  Notice that the forward slash indicates line endings, when you are quoting more than one line of a passage.

 

Macbeth is speaking not only to himself but also to others when he says, “Had I but died an hour before this chance, / I had lived a blessed time” (2.3.84-5). He describes his mental state with this declaration: “There’s nothing serious in mortality” (2.3.86). His innermost thoughts are made public with the metaphorical statement that “All is but toys” (2.3.87).

 

introduce someone’s statement with a comma

a more emphatic, pronounced lead-in to a quotation uses a colon

no punctuation needed when simply quoting a phrase or clause

agenda F/M Apr 27/30: death of Macbeth

learning goal: How much or how little does the following description fit Macbeth: “Overcoming his queasiness, the soldier ends up submitting to the order, and is then haunted by the thought that he’s colluded in a crime” (E. Press, Beautiful Souls, 7).

15′ group discussion (give each a chance to talk)

start paragraph (specifics TBA, with email; due to TRNTN before next class begins)

start novel (see reading schedule)

 

agenda W/Th Apr 25/6: Poetry Day, Zambia, NYC, and Scotland

learning goal: Do Macbeth’s words and actions in Act 5 indicate a chiastic structure to the overall play?

Table of Contents: McKay, Corso, Ferlinghetti; quatrain, couplet, end rhyme, free verse

  1. Poetry Outloud story

Zambia story

Claude McKay’s “America”

two student recitations  (Jackson, Niermeyer)

2. Conscience in the news

Conscience in the news

 

3. Macbeth’s behavior–how much a match? (5.2.1 ff.)  film? 

How much or how little does the following description fit Macbeth:

“Overcoming his queasiness, the soldier ends up submitting to the order, and is then haunted by the thought that he’s colluded in a crime” (E. Press, Beautiful Souls, 7).

agenda M/T Apr 23/4: Lady Macbeth

learning goal: what is a chiastic story structurehow much does Shakespeare’s play Macbeth fit this structure?

preview/questions about upcoming Poetry Day assignments; review feedback on last original poem)

5.1 moving the needle on Lady Macbeth’s conscience meter

film interpretation of 5.1

moving on to next scenes 5.2 ff.